Guide: How to cite a Archive material in Aging Cell style

Guide: How to cite a Archive material in Aging Cell style

Cite A Archive material in Aging Cell style

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Use the following template to cite a archive material using the Aging Cell citation style. For help with other source types, like books, PDFs, or websites, check out our other guides. To have your reference list or bibliography automatically made for you, try our free citation generator.

Key:

Pink text = information that you will need to find from the source.
Black text = text required by the Aging Cell style.

Reference list

Place this part in your bibliography or reference list at the end of your assignment.

Template:

Author Surname Author Initial (Year Published) Title.

Example:

Lynch D (2015) Map of the San Andreas Fault,

In-text citation

Place this part right after the quote or reference to the source in your assignment.

Template

(Author Surname Year Published)

Example

The San Andreas Fault is the sliding boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate. It slices California in two from Cape Mendocino to the Mexican border. San Diego, Los Angeles and Big Sur are on the Pacific Plate. San Francisco, Sacramento and the Sierra Nevada are on the North American Plate. And despite San Francisco’s legendary 1906 earthquake, the San Andreas Fault does not go through the city. But communities like Desert Hot Springs, San Bernardino, Wrightwood, Palmdale, Gorman, Frazier Park, Daly City. Point Reyes Station and Bodega Bay lie squarely on the fault and are sitting ducks. 

The San Andreas Fault is a transform fault. Imagine placing two slices of pizza on the table and sliding them past one another where they touch along a common straight edge. Bits of pepperoni from one side crumble across the boundary onto the anchovy side. The same thing happens with the fault, and the geology and landforms along the mighty rift are extremely complicated. 

The plates are slowly moving past one another at a couple of inches a year - about the same rate that your fingernails grow. But this is not a steady motion, it is the average motion. For years the plates will be locked with no movement at all as they push against one another. Suddenly the built-up strain breaks the rock along the fault and the plates slip a few feet all at once. The breaking rock sends out waves in all directions and it is the waves that we feel as earthquakes. (Lynch 2015)

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