Guide: How to cite a Magazine in chicago-figures style

Guide: How to cite a Magazine in chicago-figures style

Cite A Magazine in chicago-figures style

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Use the following template to cite a magazine using the chicago-figures citation style. For help with other source types, like books, PDFs, or websites, check out our other guides. To have your reference list or bibliography automatically made for you, try our free citation generator.

Key:

Pink text = information that you will need to find from the source.
Black text = text required by the chicago-figures style.

In-text citation

Place this part right after the quote or reference to the source in your assignment.

Template

(fig. 1)

Example

Preventing and Reducing Teen Tobacco Use
More deaths are caused each year by tobacco use than by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), illegal drug use, alcohol, motor vehicle injuries, suicides, and murders combined.[1],[2] Although tobacco use by adolescents and young adults has declined substantially in the last 40 years, in 2014, almost one in 15 high school seniors was a daily smoker, and almost one in seven had smoked at least once in the previous month.[2] A 2012 Surgeon General report notes that marketing and promotion of tobacco products exceed $1 million an hour—over $27 million a day—in the United States alone.


Tobacco Use in Children and Adolescents: Primary Care Interventions
Tobacco use remains the number one cause of preventable deaths in the United States. It is critical that efforts to prevent and reduce teen smoking continue, as the stakes could not be higher. On average, smokers die at least 10 years earlier than non-smokers and, every day, more than 1,300 people in the United States die from smoking-related causes. Almost all of these casualties began using tobacco products prior to age 18.[3],[4] The Surgeon General estimates that, if all the evidence-based youth anti-tobacco strategies were implemented, smoking among high school students would decline by more than 50 percent by 2020.[4]

Furthermore, adolescents’ use of smoking products is evolving. In 2014 and for the first time in history, more teenagers smoked electronic cigarettes (or e-cigarettes) than smoked tobacco cigarettes. These products pose a set of new challenges, as their health impact is not yet fully understood.[2] (fig. 1)

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