Guide: How to cite a Journal in Environmental Health Perspectives style

Guide: How to cite a Journal in Environmental Health Perspectives style

Cite A Journal in Environmental Health Perspectives style

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Use the following template to cite a journal using the Environmental Health Perspectives citation style. For help with other source types, like books, PDFs, or websites, check out our other guides. To have your reference list or bibliography automatically made for you, try our free citation generator.

Key:

Pink text = information that you will need to find from the source.
Black text = text required by the Environmental Health Perspectives style.

Reference list

Place this part in your bibliography or reference list at the end of your assignment.

Template:

Author Surname Author Initial. Year Published. Title. Publication Title Volume number:Pages Used; doi:DOI Number.

Example:

Simons-Morton B, Pickett W, Boyce W, ter Bogt T, Vollebergh W. 2010. Cross-national comparison of adolescent drinking and cannabis use in the United States, Canada, and the Netherlands. International Journal of Drug Policy 21:64-69; doi:10.1016/j.drugpo.2009.02.003.

In-text citation

Place this part right after the quote or reference to the source in your assignment.

Template

(Author Surname Year Published)

Example

Results

Laws regarding alcohol and cannabis were found to be strictest in the United States, somewhat less strict in Canada, and least strict in the Netherlands. On most measures of drinking, rates were lower in the United States than in Canada or the Netherlands. With United States as the referent, relative risks (RR) for monthly drinking were 1.30 (1.11–1.53) for Canadian boys and 1.55 (1.31–1.83) for girls, and 2.0 (1.73–2.31) for Dutch boys and 1.92 (1.62–2.27) for Dutch girls. Drunkenness was also higher among Canadian boys and girls and Dutch boys. However, rates of cannabis use did not differ between the countries, except that Dutch girls were less likely to use cannabis in the past year (RR= .67; 0.46–0.96).

Conclusions

The lower prevalence of adolescent drinking and drunkenness (except among Dutch girls) in the United States is consistent with the contention that strict drinking policies may limit drinking among 10th graders. However, the finding that marijuana use rates did not differ across countries is not consistent with the contention that prohibition-oriented policies deter use or that liberal marijuana policies are associated with elevated adolescent use. Based on these findings, the case for strict laws and policies is considerably weaker for marijuana than for alcohol. (Simons-Morton et al. 2010)

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