Guide: How to cite a Edited book in The Astrophysical Journal style

Guide: How to cite a Edited book in The Astrophysical Journal style

Cite A Edited book in The Astrophysical Journal style

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Use the following template to cite a edited book using the The Astrophysical Journal citation style. For help with other source types, like books, PDFs, or websites, check out our other guides. To have your reference list or bibliography automatically made for you, try our free citation generator.

Key:

Pink text = information that you will need to find from the source.
Black text = text required by the The Astrophysical Journal style.

Reference list

Place this part in your bibliography or reference list at the end of your assignment.

Template:

Publisher, Year Published, Pages Used

Example:

Geolsoc.org.uk,. 2004,

In-text citation

Place this part right after the quote or reference to the source in your assignment.

Template

1

Example

The Himalayan mountain range and Tibetan plateau have formed as a result of the collision between the Indian Plate and Eurasian Plate which began 50 million years ago and continues today.
225 million years ago (Ma) India was a large island situated off the Australian coast and separated from Asia by the Tethys Ocean. The supercontinent Pangea began to break up 200 Ma and India started a northward drift towards Asia. 80 Ma India was 6,400 km south of the Asian continent but moving towards it at a rate of between 9 and 16 cm per year. At this time Tethys Ocean floor would have been subducting northwards beneath Asia and the plate margin would have been a Convergent oceanic-continental one just like the Andes today.
Between 40 and 20 Ma the rate of northward drift slowed as the two continental plates collided and the former Tethys Ocean closed. Neither continental plate could be subducted due to their low density/buoyancy. This caused the continental crust to thicken due to folding and faulting by compressional forces. The continental crust here is twice the average thickness at around 75 km. The thickening of the continental crust marked the end of volcanic activity in the region as any magma moving upwards would solidify before it could reach the surface. The Himalayas are still rising by more than 1 cm per year as India continues to move northwards into Asia, which explains the occurrence of shallow focus earthquakes in the region today. However the forces of weathering and erosion are lowering the Himalayas at about the same rate. The Himalayas and Tibetan plateau trend east-west and extend for 2,900 km, reaching the maximum elevation of 8,848 metres (Mount Everest). 1

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