Guide: How to cite a Edited book in The Journal of Peasant Studies style

Guide: How to cite a Edited book in The Journal of Peasant Studies style

Cite A Edited book in The Journal of Peasant Studies style

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Use the following template to cite a edited book using the The Journal of Peasant Studies citation style. For help with other source types, like books, PDFs, or websites, check out our other guides. To have your reference list or bibliography automatically made for you, try our free citation generator.

Key:

Pink text = information that you will need to find from the source.
Black text = text required by the The Journal of Peasant Studies style.

Reference list

Place this part in your bibliography or reference list at the end of your assignment.

Template:

Author Surname, Author Initial. Year Published. Title. City: Publisher.

Example:

Swinburn, B., G. Sacks, K. Hall, K. McPherson, D. Finegood, M. Moodie and S. Gortmaker. 2011. The global obesity pandemic: shaped by global drivers and local environments. The Lancet, 378(9793), 804-814.

In-text citation

Place this part right after the quote or reference to the source in your assignment.

Template

(Author Surname Year Published)

Example

The simultaneous increases in obesity in almost all countries seem to be driven mainly by changes in the global food system, which is producing more processed, affordable, and effectively marketed food than ever before. This passive overconsumption of energy leading to obesity is a predictable outcome of market economies predicated on consumption-based growth. The global food system drivers interact with local environmental factors to create a wide variation in obesity prevalence between populations. Within populations, the interactions between environmental and individual factors, including genetic makeup, explain variability in body size between individuals. However, even with this individual variation, the epidemic has predictable patterns in subpopulations. In low-income countries, obesity mostly affects middle-aged adults (especially women) from wealthy, urban environments; whereas in high-income countries it affects both sexes and all ages, but is disproportionately greater in disadvantaged groups. Unlike other major causes of preventable death and disability, such as tobacco use, injuries, and infectious diseases, there are no exemplar populations in which the obesity epidemic has been reversed by public health measures. This absence increases the urgency for evidence-creating policy action, with a priority on reduction of the supply-side drivers. (Swinburn et al. 2011)

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