Guide: How to cite a Book in ULB-Hist style

Guide: How to cite a Book in ULB-Hist style

Cite A Book in ULB-Hist style

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Use the following template to cite a book using the ULB-Hist citation style. For help with other source types, like books, PDFs, or websites, check out our other guides. To have your reference list or bibliography automatically made for you, try our free citation generator.

Key:

Pink text = information that you will need to find from the source.
Black text = text required by the ULB-Hist style.

Reference list

Place this part in your bibliography or reference list at the end of your assignment.

Template:

Author Surname, A., Title, City, Publisher, Year Published, p. Pages Used.

Example:

Johnson, L. and Miller, J., 'Consequences of Large-scale Production of Marijuana in Residential Buildings', Indoor and Built Environment, vol. 21, n° 4, 2011, pp. 595-600.

In-text citation

Place this part right after the quote or reference to the source in your assignment.

Template

A. Author Surname, Title, City, Publisher, Year Published, p. Pages Used.

Example

Based on the data from the breadth of Canada (∼4300 km), one-third of Canadian homes have ventilation rates below the recommended standard of 0.3 air changes per hour and are at risk for moisture problems. For the purposes of this investigation, a literature review was performed on the health risks associated with exposure to living and drying marijuana plants and the fungi associated with large numbers of indoor plantings. Analysis was made of the impact on Canadian homes if used to grow marijuana. These are commonly called “marijuana grow operations” based on measured ventilation rates from homes in Windsor, Ontario and Regina, Saskatchewan (representing diverse climates) and derived moisture loadings from published data. The growing and drying of marijuana plants contributes considerable amounts of water vapour to the indoor environment. Depending on the scale of production, considerable mould damage in the building can result. There are also a number of abiotic hazards resulting from marijuana production including pesticides, carbon monoxide, and products of unvented combustion appliances. Both indirect and direct evidence are described for the health impact of living in these conditions. This has a number of implications in terms of documentation and personal protection for industrial hygienists, home inspectors, and public health officials. L. Johnson and J. Miller, 'Consequences of Large-scale Production of Marijuana in Residential Buildings', Indoor and Built Environment, vol. 21, n° 4, 2011, pp. 595-600.

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