These are the sources and citations used to research Feminism in art. This bibliography was generated on Cite This For Me on

  • Journal

    Aagerstoun, M. J. and Auther, E.

    Considering Feminist Activist Art

    2007 - NWSA Journal

    “Since its emergence in the 1970s, feminist activist art has consistently exhibited a diversity of subject matter and form that defies attempts to pigeonhole the practice.”

    In-text: (Aagerstoun and Auther, 2007)

    Your Bibliography: Aagerstoun, M. and Auther, E. (2007). Considering Feminist Activist Art. NWSA Journal, 19(1), p.vii-xiv.

  • Journal

    Aagerstoun, M. J. and Auther, E.

    Considering Feminist Activist Art

    2007 - NWSA Journal

    “Feminist artists have pursued activism around a wide range of issues pertaining to race, gender, and sexuality and their intersections with social, political and cultural forms of oppression.”

    In-text: (Aagerstoun and Auther, 2007)

    Your Bibliography: Aagerstoun, M. and Auther, E. (2007). Considering Feminist Activist Art. NWSA Journal, 19(1), p.vii-xiv.

  • Journal

    Aagerstoun, M. J. and Auther, E.

    Considering Feminist Activist Art

    2007 - NWSA Journal

    “They (feminist artists) have utilized a rich variety of media and approaches, including performance, installation, organized public disruption, guerrilla postering, billboards, video, radical forms of pedagogy, and other creative uses of public space that emphasize collaboration and coalition-building.”

    In-text: (Aagerstoun and Auther, 2007)

    Your Bibliography: Aagerstoun, M. and Auther, E. (2007). Considering Feminist Activist Art. NWSA Journal, 19(1), p.vii-xiv.

  • Journal

    Aagerstoun, M. J. and Auther, E.

    Considering Feminist Activist Art

    2007 - NWSA Journal

    “There is a core set of ideals that have remained historically central to the species of feminist activist art… Feminist activist art is characterized here as simultaneously critical, positive, and progressive.”

    In-text: (Aagerstoun and Auther, 2007)

    Your Bibliography: Aagerstoun, M. and Auther, E. (2007). Considering Feminist Activist Art. NWSA Journal, 19(1), p.vii-xiv.

  • Website

    Goddard, D.

    Donald Goddard Reviews Anita Steckel's Art - New York Art World.com

    2001

    “it is this constricted space in which Steckel works, confronting or coexisting with Madonna and Child, New York cityscape, Michelangelo’s creation of Adam, men on a new New York City subway, a monument to the German state, the Venus de Milo, old portraits of people, Leonardo's The Last Supper, photos of tribal life in New Guinea, Ect. And the spaces become hers. She occupies them just as surely as their images occupy our consciousness, either through her own self-image or her intrusion of other images. In a direct and often outspoken way, the work of art becomes a place where image, artist, and viewer are one.”

    In-text: (Goddard, 2001)

    Your Bibliography: Goddard, D. (2001). Donald Goddard Reviews Anita Steckel's Art - New York Art World.com. [online] Newyorkartworld.com. Available at: http://www.newyorkartworld.com/reviews/steckel.html [Accessed 4 Jan. 2018].

  • Online image or video

    Kahane, L.

    Women's Action Coalition protest at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1992

    1992

    In-text: (Kahane, 1992)

    Your Bibliography: Kahane, L. (1992). Women's Action Coalition protest at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1992. [image].

  • Book

    Kent, S. and Morreau, J.

    Women's images of men

    1990 - Pandora - London

    “Art practice with no overt political content may, nevertheless, be able to sensitize us politically”

    In-text: (Kent and Morreau, 1990)

    Your Bibliography: Kent, S. and Morreau, J. (1990). Women's images of men. London: Pandora.

  • Interview

    Komar, J.

    John Komar, as cited in a public-television newscast.

    1972

    "In some senses, pornographic," to relocate the show to "a more appropriate venue on campus such as... the men's or women's restroom"

    In-text: (Komar, 1972)

    Your Bibliography: Komar, J. (1972). John Komar, as cited in a public-television newscast..

  • Book

    Mark, L. G. and Butler, C. H.

    Wack!

    2007 - Museum of Contemporary Art - Los Angeles

    “In the space of a generation feminism transformed social relations, personal identities, and institutional structures.”

    In-text: (Mark and Butler, 2007)

    Your Bibliography: Mark, L. and Butler, C. (2007). Wack!. Los Angeles: Museum of Contemporary Art.

  • Book

    Mark, L. G. and Butler, C. H.

    Wack!

    2007 - Museum of Contemporary Art - Los Angeles

    “... feminism’s impact on art in the 1970’s constitutes the most influential international “movement” of any during the postwar period in spite or perhaps because of the fact that it seldom cohered, formally or critically, into a movement the way abstract expressionism minimalism or even Fluxus did.”

    In-text: (Mark and Butler, 2007)

    Your Bibliography: Mark, L. and Butler, C. (2007). Wack!. Los Angeles: Museum of Contemporary Art.

  • Book

    Mark, L. G. and Butler, C. H.

    Wack!

    2007 - Museum of Contemporary Art - Los Angeles

    “Women artists working out of the hegemonic and repressive context of India…. Emphasised the resistance against, cultural traditions of representation by incorporating very specific references to transculturalism, … the practices of these artists… can be considered in relation to feminism, though they did not engage in the same critical terms as their western counterparts.”

    In-text: (Mark and Butler, 2007)

    Your Bibliography: Mark, L. and Butler, C. (2007). Wack!. Los Angeles: Museum of Contemporary Art.

  • Book

    Mark, L. G. and Butler, C. H.

    Wack!

    2007 - Museum of Contemporary Art - Los Angeles

    “Feminism often coexisted with political engagement on other fronts such as race, class, and sexual orientation, which at times superseded feminism as the dominant discourse within which they preferred to situate their work.”

    In-text: (Mark and Butler, 2007)

    Your Bibliography: Mark, L. and Butler, C. (2007). Wack!. Los Angeles: Museum of Contemporary Art.

  • Book

    Mark, L. G. and Butler, C. H.

    Wack!

    2007 - Museum of Contemporary Art - Los Angeles

    “In 1992, when word spread that the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum’s inaugural exhibition for its SoHo space would only feature the work of white male artists, WAC (women’s action coalition) found a target for it’s protests. The New York art world, for a moment, was focused in a very public way on its own inequities. WAC also staged demonstrations around incidences of rape, media discrimination, and anti-women’s rights legislation.”

    In-text: (Mark and Butler, 2007)

    Your Bibliography: Mark, L. and Butler, C. (2007). Wack!. Los Angeles: Museum of Contemporary Art.

  • Book

    Mark, L. G. and Butler, C. H.

    Wack!

    2007 - Museum of Contemporary Art - Los Angeles

    “Triangle, Fuses, and Jeanne Dielman position sexual desire and pleasure as positive forces in the production of female subjectivity and political agency…”

    In-text: (Mark and Butler, 2007)

    Your Bibliography: Mark, L. and Butler, C. (2007). Wack!. Los Angeles: Museum of Contemporary Art.

  • Book

    Mark, L. G. and Butler, C. H.

    Wack!

    2007 - Museum of Contemporary Art - Los Angeles

    “... yet they all walk a fine line between articulating sexed subjectivity and displaying female sexuality as an object.”

    In-text: (Mark and Butler, 2007)

    Your Bibliography: Mark, L. and Butler, C. (2007). Wack!. Los Angeles: Museum of Contemporary Art.

  • Book

    Mark, L. G. and Butler, C. H.

    Wack!

    2007 - Museum of Contemporary Art - Los Angeles

    “...I want to assert that feminism constitutes an ideology of shifting criteria, one influenced and mediated by myriad other factors. Whereas art movements traditionally defined by charismatic individuals tended to be explicated and debated through manifestos and other writings, feminism is a relatively open-ended system that has, throughout its history of engagement with visual art, sustained an unprecedented degree of internal critique and contained wildly divergent political ideologies and practices.”

    In-text: (Mark and Butler, 2007)

    Your Bibliography: Mark, L. and Butler, C. (2007). Wack!. Los Angeles: Museum of Contemporary Art.

  • Book

    Reckitt, H. and Phelan, P.

    Art and feminism

    2006 - Phaidon - London

    "The conviction that gender has been, and continues to be, a fundamental category for the organisation of culture. Moreover, the pattern of that organisation usually favours men over women."

    In-text: (Reckitt and Phelan, 2006)

    Your Bibliography: Reckitt, H. and Phelan, P. (2006). Art and feminism. London: Phaidon.

  • Magazine

    Seiberling, D. and Steckel, A.

    The Female View Of Erotica

    1974 - New York Magazine

    “I felt [this] was an unfair way of editing myself… so I went in fighting: I showed my strongest sexual art - and it caused an uproar.”

    In-text: (Seiberling and Steckel, 1974)

    Your Bibliography: Seiberling, D. and Steckel, A. (1974). The Female View Of Erotica. New York Magazine, (7, no. 6), p.56.

  • Artwork

    Steckel, A.

    Giant Woman On Empire State

    1969 - New York

    In-text: (Steckel, 1969)

    Your Bibliography: Steckel, A. (1969). Giant Woman On Empire State. [Ink, and Oil Paint on Found Photograph] New York: Mitchell Algus Gallery.

  • Presentation or lecture

    Steckel, A.

    Feminist Artist Statement

    1973 - NYC

    "It is always the men who cover their sex, who hide what they consider ‘their shame’, who think of their sexuality as unwholesome - the ‘fig leaf tradition’. We women artists object to this unhealthy and sexist discrimination and we demand an end to past sexist puritanisms in museums..." "...And since the woman has traditionally been exposed in her full nakedness and sexuality in all the great museums of the world, so should the male be uncovered, as sexually on display as the woman; the erect penis therefore, as it is part of life, will no longer be prevented from being part of art. If the erect penis is not wholesome enough to go into museums it should not be considered wholesome enough to go into women. And if the erect penis is wholesome enough to go into women then it is more than wholesome enough to go into the greatest art museums.”

    In-text: (Steckel, 1973)

    Your Bibliography: Steckel, A. (1973). Feminist Artist Statement.

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