These are the sources and citations used to research Critical Musicology Assignment: Authorship. This bibliography was generated on Cite This For Me on

  • Website

    Challis, B.

    2015 - n.p.

    Did Harrison deliberately use the music of He’s So Fine? I do not believe he did so deliberately. Nevertheless, it is clear that My Sweet Lord is the very same song as He’s So Fine with different words, and Harrison had access to He’s So Fine. This is, under the law, infringement of copyright, and is no less so even though subconsciously accomplished,

    In-text: (Challis, 2015)

    Your Bibliography: Challis, B. (2015). [online] Wipo.int. Available at: http://www.wipo.int/wipo_magazine/en/2015/05/article_0008.html [Accessed 5 Mar. 2018].

  • Website

    Amen break

    n.p.

    In-text: (En.wikipedia.org, n.d.)

    Your Bibliography: En.wikipedia.org. (n.d.). Amen break. [online] Available at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amen_break [Accessed 5 Mar. 2018].

  • Website

    Appropriation (music)

    n.p.

    In-text: (En.wikipedia.org, n.d.)

    Your Bibliography: En.wikipedia.org. (n.d.). Appropriation (music). [online] Available at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appropriation_(music) [Accessed 5 Mar. 2018].

  • Website

    Goodwin, M.

    Friday essay: the art of the pinch – popular music and appropriation

    2017 - n.p.

    Cultural appropriation in a musical context doesn’t have to be at the exclusion of the original artist or the culture from which they carved their path. Pinching musical phrases and stylistic approaches – when done thoughtfully and with a desire to connect with the original work’s unique properties – has always been a part of the art making process.

    In-text: (Goodwin, 2017)

    Your Bibliography: Goodwin, M. (2017). Friday essay: the art of the pinch – popular music and appropriation. [online] The Conversation. Available at: https://theconversation.com/friday-essay-the-art-of-the-pinch-popular-music-and-appropriation-86919 [Accessed 5 Mar. 2018].

  • Website

    M, K.

    Cite a Website - Cite This For Me

    2016 - Katherine M

    In-text: (M, 2016)

    Your Bibliography: M, K. (2016). Cite a Website - Cite This For Me. [online] Etd.ohiolink.edu. Available at: https://etd.ohiolink.edu/!etd.send_file?accession=osu1461148846&disposition=inline [Accessed 5 Mar. 2018].

  • Website

    Morrison, M. D.

    Gaye vs. Thicke: Blurred lines of copyright infringement? | OUP

    2015 - n.p.

    Being reminiscent of a ‘sound’ is not copyright infringement. The intent in producing ‘Blurred Lines’ was to evoke an era. In reality, the Gaye defendants are claiming ownership of an entire genre, as opposed to a specific work.

    In-text: (Morrison, 2015)

    Your Bibliography: Morrison, M. (2015). Gaye vs. Thicke: Blurred lines of copyright infringement? | OUP. [online] OUPblog. Available at: https://blog.oup.com/2015/03/blurred-lines-copyright-infringement/ [Accessed 5 Mar. 2018].

  • Website

    Roberts, R.

    How the 'Blurred Lines' case could have chilling effect on creativity

    2015 - Ross Levinsohn

    In-text: (Roberts, 2015)

    Your Bibliography: Roberts, R. (2015). How the 'Blurred Lines' case could have chilling effect on creativity. [online] latimes.com. Available at: http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/la-et-ms-blurred-lines-notebook-pharrell-williams-robin-thicke-marvin-gaye-20150306-column.html [Accessed 5 Mar. 2018].

  • Website

    Runtagh, J.

    Songs on Trial: 12 Landmark Music Copyright Cases

    2016 - Jann Wenner

    In-text: (Runtagh, 2016)

    Your Bibliography: Runtagh, J. (2016). Songs on Trial: 12 Landmark Music Copyright Cases. [online] Rolling Stone. Available at: https://www.rollingstone.com/music/lists/songs-on-trial-10-landmark-music-copyright-cases-20160608/george-harrison-vs-the-chiffons-1976-20160608 [Accessed 5 Mar. 2018].

  • Website

    Schrodt, P.

    The $5 million 'Blurred Lines' legal fight over the song's 'vibe' could permanently change the music industry

    2015 - Henry Blodget

    I think that saying that Pharrell and Thicke were inspired by a genre or a feeling that they gleaned somehow from Marvin Gaye is definitely new territory in copyright infringement,

    In-text: (Schrodt, 2015)

    Your Bibliography: Schrodt, P. (2015). The $5 million 'Blurred Lines' legal fight over the song's 'vibe' could permanently change the music industry. [online] Business Insider. Available at: http://uk.businessinsider.com/blurred-lines-case-music-copyright-2015-12 [Accessed 5 Mar. 2018].

  • Website

    Pharrell Williams and Robin Thicke to pay $7.4m to Marvin Gaye's family over Blurred Lines

    2015 - n.p.

    In-text: (the Guardian, 2015)

    Your Bibliography: the Guardian. (2015). Pharrell Williams and Robin Thicke to pay $7.4m to Marvin Gaye's family over Blurred Lines. [online] Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/music/2015/mar/10/blurred-lines-pharrell-robin-thicke-copied-marvin-gaye [Accessed 5 Mar. 2018].

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