Guide: How to cite a Presentation or lecture in Frontiers medical journals style

Guide: How to cite a Presentation or lecture in Frontiers medical journals style

Cite A Presentation or lecture in Frontiers medical journals style

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Use the following template to cite a presentation or lecture using the Frontiers medical journals citation style. For help with other source types, like books, PDFs, or websites, check out our other guides. To have your reference list or bibliography automatically made for you, try our free citation generator.

Key:

Pink text = information that you will need to find from the source.
Black text = text required by the Frontiers medical journals style.

Reference list

Place this part in your bibliography or reference list at the end of your assignment.

Template:

1. Author Surname Author Initial. Title.  (Year Published)

Example:

1. Males M, Buchen L. Reforming marijuana laws: Which approach best reduces the harms of criminalization?. Cjcjorg (2014) Available at: http://www.cjcj.org/news/8200 [Accessed April 27, 2015]

In-text citation

Place this part right after the quote or reference to the source in your assignment.

Template

(1)

Example

The  analysis compares five states that implemented major marijuana reforms over the last five years, evaluating the reforms' impacts on marijuana arrests, racial disparities, and various health and safety outcomes. California, Connecticut, and Massachusetts have decriminalized small quantities of marijuana for all ages, while Colorado and Washington have legalized small quantities of the substance for people 21 and older.

Key findings:

All five states experienced substantial declines in marijuana possession arrests. The four states with available data also showed unexpected drops in marijuana felony arrests.
States that decriminalized marijuana for all ages experienced the largest decreases in marijuana arrests or cases, led by drops among young people and for low-level possession. 
Staggering racial disparities remain — and in some cases are exacerbated — following marijuana reforms. African Americans are still more likely to be arrested for marijuana offenses after reform than all other races and ethnicities were before reform.
Marijuana decriminalization in California has not resulted in harmful consequences for teenagers, such as increased crime, drug overdose, driving under the influence, or school dropout. In fact, California teenagers showed improvements in all risk areas after reform.
Given the consequences of marijuana arrest, including fines, jail time, a criminal record, loss of student loans and other federal aid, and court costs, getting arrested for marijuana use may be more harmful than the drug itself — at any age. The report recommends adopting the best of both approaches and moving toward full legalization. Further reforms, beyond marijuana policies, will be necessary to address egregious and persistent racial disparities. (1)

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