These are the sources and citations used to research Dr.Suess Racist illustrations. This bibliography was generated on Cite This For Me on

  • Website

    Political Cartoons

    2021

    "Waiting for the signal home" Dr Suess, 1942

    In-text: (Political Cartoons, 2021)

    Your Bibliography: http://theodorgeisel.weebly.com/political-cartoons.html. 2021. Political Cartoons.

  • Website

    Was the Cat in the Hat Black?: Exploring Dr. Seuss’s Racial Imagination

    2021

    "The Cat in the Hat is racially complicated, inspired by blackface performance, racist images in popular culture, and actual African Americans. The Cat’s influences help us to track the evolution of the African American cultural imaginary in Seuss’s work, but also, more importantly, to exemplify how children’s literature conceals its own racialized origins. Considering the Cat’s racial complexity both serves as an act of desegregation, acknowledging the "mixed bloodlines" (to borrow Shelley Fisher Fishkin’s phrase) of canonical children’s literature, and highlights how during the 1950s—a turning point for African Americans in children’s literature—picture books were a site where race, representation, and power were actively being contested.​ Decades before the birth of his Cat in the Hat, racial caricature was an accepted part of Theodor Seuss Geisel’s childhood. D. W. Griffith’s acclaimed Birth of a Nation (1915), released the month Geisel turned eleven, offered a popular and racist depiction of the Civil War and Reconstruction. The Jazz Singer (1927), the first feature-length "talking picture," starred Al Jolson in blackface. One of Geisel’s favorite childhood books, Peter Newell’s The Hole Book (1908), follows a bullet’s [End Page 71] comically disruptive journey through its pages, including one where a black mammy points to the hole in the watermelon, and addresses, in dialect, a group of wide-eyed black children: "‘Who plugged dat melon?’ mammy cried, / As through the door she came. / ‘I’d spank de chile dat done dat trick / Ef I could learn his name’" (fig. 1). Seuss remembered this book so well that sixty years after reading it, he could still quote its opening verse by heart (Nel, Dr. Seuss 18). If, as Tony Watkins has argued, "books tells stories that contribute to children’s unconscious sense of the ‘homeland’" (193), then these stories may have embedded racist caricature in Geisel’s unconscious, as an ordinary part of his visual imagination.​"

    In-text: (Was the Cat in the Hat Black?: Exploring Dr. Seuss’s Racial Imagination, 2021)

    Your Bibliography: Instatutional. 2021. Was the Cat in the Hat Black?: Exploring Dr. Seuss’s Racial Imagination. [online] Available at: <https://muse.jhu.edu/article/546522> [Accessed 24 May 2021].

  • Website

    Reading ‘Green Eggs & Ham’ as an LGBT Narrative to Piss off Dr. Seuss

    2021

    "If I Ran the Zoo perpetuate offensive stereotypes, from Chinese characters with bright yellow skin, to African characters wearing grass skirts, and Arab characters riding camels. Nevertheless, because Dr. Seuss and his books were a product of their time, and because publishers have already edited out as much text and illustrations as possible while still preserving the integrity of his work, children today continue to read these books. That is why it’s so important to reclaim the narrative, to read Dr. Seuss books in such a way that their lessons are no longer just a product of Dr. Seuss’ time.​"

    In-text: (Reading ‘Green Eggs & Ham’ as an LGBT Narrative to Piss off Dr. Seuss, 2021)

    Your Bibliography: Medium. 2021. Reading ‘Green Eggs & Ham’ as an LGBT Narrative to Piss off Dr. Seuss. [online] Available at: <https://medium.com/life-is-lit/reading-green-eggs-and-ham-as-an-lgbt-narrative-to-piss-off-dr-seuss-377be82833ba> [Accessed 24 May 2021].

  • Website

    Reading ‘Green Eggs & Ham’ as an LGBT Narrative to Piss off Dr. Seuss

    2021

    In-text: (Reading ‘Green Eggs & Ham’ as an LGBT Narrative to Piss off Dr. Seuss, 2021)

    Your Bibliography: Medium. 2021. Reading ‘Green Eggs & Ham’ as an LGBT Narrative to Piss off Dr. Seuss. [online] Available at: <https://medium.com/life-is-lit/reading-green-eggs-and-ham-as-an-lgbt-narrative-to-piss-off-dr-seuss-377be82833ba> [Accessed 24 May 2021].

  • Website

    Dr. Seuss Books Can Be Racist, But Students Keep Reading Them

    2021

    "But some of Seuss' classics have been criticized for the way they portray people of color. In And To Think That I Saw It On Mulberry Street, for example, a character described as Chinese has two lines for eyes, carries chopsticks and a bowl of rice, and wears traditional Japanese-style shoes. In If I Ran the Zoo, two men said to be from Africa are shown shirtless, shoeless and wearing grass skirts as they carry an exotic animal. Outside of his books, the author's personal legacy has come into question, too — Seuss wrote an entire minstrel show in high school and performed as the main character in full blackface."

    In-text: (Dr. Seuss Books Can Be Racist, But Students Keep Reading Them, 2021)

    Your Bibliography: NPR. 2021. Dr. Seuss Books Can Be Racist, But Students Keep Reading Them. [online] Available at: <​ https://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2019/02/26/695966537/classic-books-are-full-of-problems-why-cant-we-put-them-down?t=1621350606476> [Accessed 24 May 2021].

  • Website

    Rethinking & Examining Dr. Seuss’ Racism

    2021

    The role the Cat “performs” in The Cat in the Hat mimics the role of blackface performers in minstrel shows.​ The “black” Cat’s purpose is to entertain and perform “tricks” for the white children: “I know some new tricks, A lot of good tricks. I will show them to you. Your mother Will not mind at all if I do” (Seuss, 1957).It was rooted in bullying that he experienced as child, growing up German-American in America during WWI. As is often the case, the victim then emulates the bully when the tables are turned.

    In-text: (Rethinking & Examining Dr. Seuss’ Racism, 2021)

    Your Bibliography: Pragmaticmom.com. 2021. Rethinking & Examining Dr. Seuss’ Racism. [online] Available at: <https://www.pragmaticmom.com/2017/05/examining-dr-seuss-racism/> [Accessed 24 May 2021].

  • Website

    Rethinking & Examining Dr. Seuss’ Racism

    2021

    "Racial Analysis of The Cat in the Hat as Blackface Minstrel​ The “Cat in the Hat” is significant as Dr. Seuss’s most hypervisible and iconic character. The book, The Cat in the Hat, is the 2nd best-selling Dr. Seuss book of all time (after Green Eggs & Ham), has sold 15.5 million copies (Random House) and is the 9th best-selling children’s books of all time (Publisher’s Weekly). The NEA named it one of its “Teachers’ Top 100 Books for Children” and sells the iconic red and white striped hat through its Read Across America website. Children and adults across the country will be seen wearing the “Cat’s” hat at school on Dr. Seuss’s birthday every year for Read Across America Day. In his upcoming book, Dr. Philip Nel, children’s literature scholar and University Distinguished Professor of English, presents extensive research on the racialized origins of The Cat in the Hat as “inspired by blackface performance, racist images in popular culture, and actual African Americans” (Nel, 2015).6 Dr. Seuss himself was heavily influenced by minstrelsy and blackface performance. He even wrote and acted in a minstrel show for his high school called “Chicopee Surprised.” Seuss performed in blackface (Nel, 2017). Minstrel shows exploited Black stereotypes for profit and mocked African Americans and Black culture. They were a white interpretation of how Black people are: “subservient”, “ignorant”, “buffoonish”, “lazy”; and how they should be: serving and performing at the pleasure (and profit) of whites.​ ​ I think that it’s a mistake to rewrite history into a idealized version of Dr. Seuss, which perpetuates picture books with inherent but subtle racist themes within his books. The opportunity for children is to learn from his racism and his bullying experiences so that history doesn’t repeat itself. I am told that Dr. Seuss’s heirs rationalize hiding Dr. Seuss’s racism as being a product of the times. I would ask them if a children’s author today supported a Muslim ban because “all Muslims are terrorists” and that “Mexicans are all rapists,” is it is acceptable as the nature of our current times? What if they used their fame and popularity to spread this message? Should these authors’ racism seen as a product of our times since indeed, one could rationalize that it is the position of America’s own president! One hundred years later, should we venerate those authors? Or, is this an opportunity to teach children about courage, and taking a stand for what they believe is right? That a single person or even child can make a difference? Katie and I will continue to speak out against Dr. Seuss as the representative of Read Across America. It’s telegraphing that this is a WHITE ONLY event meant to reinforce a White Supremacy narrative. I will visit the Dr. Seuss museum for myself to see if any of his racist images are on display.​"

    In-text: (Rethinking & Examining Dr. Seuss’ Racism, 2021)

    Your Bibliography: Pragmaticmom.com. 2021. Rethinking & Examining Dr. Seuss’ Racism. [online] Available at: <https://www.pragmaticmom.com/2017/05/examining-dr-seuss-racism/> [Accessed 24 May 2021].

  • Website

    Surprise! It’s Racist! Unwanted Children’s Book Surprises.

    2021

    "If I Ran a zoo", 1950

    In-text: (Surprise! It’s Racist! Unwanted Children’s Book Surprises., 2021)

    Your Bibliography: School Library Journal. 2021. Surprise! It’s Racist! Unwanted Children’s Book Surprises.. [online] Available at: <https://www.slj.com/?detailStory=surprise-its-racist-unwanted-childrens-book-surprises> [Accessed 24 May 2021].

  • Website

    About Tony Watkins

    2021

    "Tony Watkins is a speaker and writer on media, culture, and the Bible, and is doing doctoral research (through Cambridge Theological Federation) in the relationship between the biblical prophets and today’s media. He works both independently and in partnership with several organisations including Damaris Norway and the Lausanne Media Engagement Network (as Network Co-ordinator). He is an adjunct lecturer at NLA Kristiansand (Gimlekollen School of Journalism and Communication), Norway.​" If, as Tony Watkins has argued, "books tells stories that contribute to children’s unconscious sense of the ‘homeland’" (193), then these stories may have embedded racist caricature in Geisel’s unconscious, as an ordinary part of his visual imagination.​ ​ ​

    In-text: (About Tony Watkins, 2021)

    Your Bibliography: Tony Watkins. 2021. About Tony Watkins. [online] Available at: <https://www.tonywatkins.co.uk/about-tony-watkins/> [Accessed 24 May 2021].

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