These are the sources and citations used to research gantt chart. This bibliography was generated on Cite This For Me on

  • Book

    Cross, B. L. and Brohman, M. K.

    Project leadership

    In-text: (Cross and Brohman, n.d.)

    Your Bibliography: Cross, B. and Brohman, M. (n.d.). Project leadership.

  • Website

    What is a Gantt Chart? Gantt Chart Information, history and Software

    2016

    A Gantt chart, commonly used in project management, is one of the most popular and useful ways of showing activities (tasks or events) displayed against time. On the left of the chart is a list of the activities and along the top is a suitable time scale. Each activity is represented by a bar; the position and length of the bar reflects the start date, duration and end date of the activity.

    In-text: (Gantt.com, 2016)

    Your Bibliography: Gantt.com. (2016). What is a Gantt Chart? Gantt Chart Information, history and Software. [online] Available at: http://www.gantt.com/ [Accessed 10 Apr. 2016].

  • Website

    Advantages and Disadvantages of Gantt Charts - PM Hut

    2009

    In-text: (Pmhut.com, 2009)

    Your Bibliography: Pmhut.com. (2009). Advantages and Disadvantages of Gantt Charts - PM Hut. [online] Available at: http://www.pmhut.com/advantages-and-disadvantages-of-gantt-charts [Accessed 10 Apr. 2016].

  • Website

    Project Management Guru Schedule Planning

    2016

    Buffer Management - Buffer management reduces the buffer that is inherent in the estimates of uncertain activities. When estimating uncertain activities, project managers tend to allow for the uncertainty by using a conservative estimate. (This is not the same as "padding" an estimate which just arbitrarily adds time or money to an estimate - rather this is a conscious decision to prepare for the unknowns associated with the uncertain activity.) Buffer management removes the buffer from the activity estimate, thereby creating an aggressive activity estimate. The setting of aggressive activity goals will often result in a reduced activity duration. However, the risk is that now there is a much higher probability that the activity will finish late as compared to the plan. When this technique is used, the project manager needs to maintain a project-level schedule reserve to compensate for the activities that will be late. Crashing - Crashing accelerates an activity by adding additional resources. Some activity durations are limited by resource availability - more resources would allow a faster completion. While this is not true for all activities, it is true for some. (A 72-hour burn-in test on a printed circuit card module cannot be accelerated by adding additional test technicians - it still takes 72 hours. However a dedicated courier can deliver a report overnight that would normally take three days to deliver by mail.) This will often increase the overall cost of the project as the additional resources are often added at a premium. Fast-tracking - Fast-tracking accelerates the project by starting activities prior to the completion of all the predecessor activities. This can only be done when there is a preliminary result of the predecessor activities. For instance, a preliminary Bill of Materials may be developed during a design process and raw materials for production may be ordered based upon the preliminary Bill. (This is often done when ordering Long Lead Material.) If the Bill of Material does not change during the final design review and baselining process, the project is accelerated. However, if the final Bill of Material does change, the material ordered from the preliminary Bill may need to be reworked or scrapped - increasing the effort and cost to the project. This technique is viable when the predecessor activity has a preliminary deliverable that the project management team believes is stable. Split-to-Phases - The Split-to-Phases technique is used when the project has multiple, separable objectives. The scope of the project is divided into phases based upon the activities that are unique to a project objective. This allows a focusing of project resources on the activities supporting one of the objectives at the expense of the activities supporting a different objective. This will result in an early completion of a portion of the project, but usually causes a delay in another portion of the project and often an increase in cost because of activities that must be repeated for each of the phases. (For instance there may be a User Acceptance Test that would now need to be done twice instead of just once.) This acceleration technique is appropriate only when the completion of the first phase is able to immediately start producing some business benefit, without the completion of the succeeding phases. Mainline-Offline Scheduling - the Mainline-Offline technique separates the work within an activity into two components. The first is that which can be done generically without specific knowledge of the results of predecessor activities. The second is that which can only be done once the predecessor activities are complete. An example would be creating a project requirements document. A generic template can be created based upon the general understanding of the project. The specific requirements are identified based upon meetings with stakeholders or analysis of business processes. (One of the business benefits of a Project Management Office is that it develops and maintains these templates and generic activities, allowing projects to be accelerated through the use of them.) This technique only works with some activities, and requires the foresight to anticipate the need for the generic portion of the activity to be accomplished prior to the completion of the predecessor activities. Once an activity has started, there is no advantage to do the activity first in a generic manner and then in the project specific method.

    In-text: (Projectmanagementguru.com, 2016)

    Your Bibliography: Projectmanagementguru.com. (2016). Project Management Guru Schedule Planning. [online] Available at: http://www.projectmanagementguru.com/scheduleplan.html [Accessed 12 Apr. 2016].

  • Website

    Anon

    2016

    In-text: (Smartsheet.com, 2016)

    Your Bibliography: Smartsheet.com. (2016). [online] Available at: https://www.smartsheet.com/sites/default/files/Gantt_chart_excel_0.png [Accessed 10 Apr. 2016].

  • E-book or PDF

    Stoneburner, J. D.

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT METHODS FOR ACCELERATED PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

    2016 - San José State University

    In-text: (Stoneburner, 2016)

    Your Bibliography: Stoneburner, J. (2016). PROJECT MANAGEMENT METHODS FOR ACCELERATED PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT. 1st ed. [ebook] San José State University. Available at: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.196.5174&rep=rep1&type=pdf [Accessed 11 Apr. 2016].

  • Website

    Pros and cons of the Gantt chart

    2016

    In-text: (Techadvisory.org, 2016)

    Your Bibliography: Techadvisory.org. (2016). Pros and cons of the Gantt chart. [online] Available at: http://www.techadvisory.org/2013/08/pros-and-cons-of-the-gantt-chart/ [Accessed 10 Apr. 2016].

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